What are Pull Requests and what can they tell us?

Pull Requests are code changes that are often bundled in a set of commits and signify a feature item. As seen from the previous metric sections, Pull Requests contain a lot of meta data that Logilica analyses to detect signal around your productivity, collaboration speed and team health.

Long-Running Pull Requests are generally where most problems stem from and lowering this number means lowering the number of bottlenecks within your system. Adversely, if this number is high then it is good to drill-down and find where the bottlenecks in your system are so that you can fix them and increase productivity.

 

Pull Requests Per Week

What is Pull Requests per Week?

As the name suggests, this number refers to the raw amount of Pull Requests that were finished/merged this week.

What does Pull Requests Per Week do?

Very simply put, PRs per Week show you the productivity of your team through the week. Generally speaking, a high Pull Request Count means that your team is being productive while a low count means that there may be bottlenecks in the project.

 

Why use Pull Requests per Week?

The Pull Requests per Week is a consistent way to see if there are bottlenecks in the project especially when compared alongside the Average Cycle Time graph. If Cycle Time is high but PRs per Week is also high, you may find that there are no actual bottlenecks in the project but rather overloading and vice versa.

Pull Requests Per Contributor

What is Pull Requests per Contributor?

Pull Requests per Contributor show the average amount of PRs that each contributor in the team is finalizing per week.

What does Pull Requests Per Contributor do?

Very simply put, PRs per Contributor show you the productivity of your team through the week. Generally speaking, a high Pull Request average means that your team is being productive while a low count means that there may be bottlenecks in the project.

 

Why use Pull Requests per Contributor?

The Pull Requests per Contributor is another good way to see Productivity, this time in the average amount of work done. If it spikes up or down too much it could indicate Overload on one developers end and should be drilled-down further.

Long-Running Pull Requests

What is Long-Running Pull Requests?

Long-Running Pull Requests is a metric that shows Pull Requests that haven’t be merged/completed for more than 72 hours after creation.

What does Long-Running Pull Requests do?

Long-Running Pull Requests show the most likely sources of blockers or bottlenecks in the system. A high number here could be an indication of a large number of blocking items or work that should be broken up into smaller pieces.

Why use Long-Running Pull Requests?

The Long-Running Pull Requests metric is arguably one of the most important metrics within Logilica Insights. It’s a direct way to find bottlenecks in the system and an easy starting point to drill-down into.

Lost Time on Discarded Pull Requests

What is Lost Time on Discarded Pull Requests?

Lost Time on Discarded Pull Requests shows the total lost time on Pull Requests that have been abandoned or closed without merging.

What does Lost Time on Discarded Pull Requests do?

It shows how much time is being wasted on work that does not finish. A low amount can signify growth and innovation, however, if the total hours lost is high it could be a signal that the team is not communicating requirements effectively, or that priorities and requirements are changing quickly.

 

Why use Lost Time on Discarded Pull Requests?

Lost Time on Discarded Pull Requests is a good way of seeing the time that is spent ‘not doing work’, and comparing that to the productivity of the system.


 

Consistency of Pull Request Workflow

What is Consistency of Pull Request Workflow?

Consistency of Pull Request Workflow is a visual indicator of how the work is divided within the system and the steps that all the work follows.

What does Consistency of Pull Request Workflow do?

This metric shows where there are skips in Pull Request merging and can show the cause of an abnormally low cycle time. Organised teams have a uniform flow through each of the pull request life cycle stages. A large deviation in the flow could be an indicator of quality or team communication issues.

Why use Consistency of Pull Request Workflow?

It helps find critical flaws in the system that should be addressed with a high level of seriousness, as half-done PRs can cause future problems for the team to fix.

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